Funding and Cost Share Programmes

Roche New Zealand has a number of Cost Share Programmes designed to help reduce the cost of medicines which are not funded by the government’s drug buying agency, PHARMAC. These programmes offer assistance with the cost of your medicine. A number of doses or ‘cycles’ of the medicine are provided free of charge (the cost of the Roche medicine only).

In some cases, the programme also caps the total amount you will pay for your medicine. Once a patient reaches the cap, Roche will provide ongoing medicine at no cost. Other costs such as doctors’ fees and administration costs will still apply.

The medicine costs are spread over time, so not all of it has to be paid immediately. Patients usually pay for each cycle as they go, meaning they only pay for treatment while they benefit from it. Your specialist will be able to give you more information on the costs associated with your treatment.

There are criteria for enrolling into the Cost Share Programmes and your specialist can give you the details.

Avastin

Avastin is not funded by the government’s drug buying agency, PHARMAC. This means you will have to pay for this treatment. This could be covered by your health insurance, through fundraising programmes or out of your own pocket.

Under the Avastin Cost Share Programme a number of doses or ‘cycles’ of the medicine are provided free (the cost of the Roche medicine only). The Avastin Cost Share Programme also limits or caps the total amount you pay for Avastin. Once a patient reaches the cap, Roche will provide ongoing Avastin at no cost, for as long as you continue to respond to treatment, or until you experience disease progression.

Even if you make use of the Cost Share Programme, you will still have to pay for additional costs, such as specialist care and administration at a private treatment centre. Check to see if these costs are covered by your health insurance policy, if you have one. The costs for Avastin are spread over time, so not all of it has to be paid immediately. Patients usually pay for each cycle as they go, meaning they only pay for treatment while they benefit from it.

If you’d like more information on the Avastin Cost Share Programme speak to your specialist. They can give you further details about whether Avastin is right for you, the associated costs and eligibility.

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Gazyva

GAZYVA is a funded medicine for first line CLL under Special Authority for patients who meet predefined criteria. GAZYVA is unfunded for NHL. For patients who do not meet the predefined criteria there is a Cost Share programme available. This means you will have to pay for this treatment if you do not meet the predefined criteria. This could be covered by your health insurance, through fundraising programmes or out of your own pocket.

Under the Gazyva Cost Share Programme a number of doses or ‘cycles’ of the medicine are provided free (the cost of the Roche medicine only).

Even if you make use of the Cost Share Programme, you will still have to pay for additional costs, such as specialist care and administration at a private treatment centre. Check to see if these costs are covered by your health insurance policy, if you have one. The costs for Gazyva are spread over time, so not all of it has to be paid immediately. Patients usually pay for each cycle as they go, meaning they only pay for treatment while they benefit from it.

If you’d like more information on the Gazyva Cost Share Programme speak to your specialist. They can give you further details about whether Gazyva is right for you, the associated costs and eligibility.

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Herceptin

Herceptin is publicly funded in New Zealand for the treatment of HER2-positive early breast cancer for 12 months of therapy. Herceptin is publicly funded in New Zealand for the treatment of HER2-positive metastatic or advanced breast cancer for as long as the patient continues to benefit

Herceptin is not funded for advanced HER2-positive stomach (gastric) cancer by the government’s drug buying agency, PHARMAC. This means you will have to pay for this treatment. This could be covered by your health insurance, through fundraising programmes or out of your own pocket.

Under the Herceptin Gastric Cost Share Programme a number of doses or ‘cycles’ of the medicine are provided free (the cost of the Roche medicine only). The Herceptin Gastric Cost Share Programme also limits or caps the total amount you pay for Herceptin. Once a patient reaches the cap, Roche will provide ongoing Herceptin at no cost, for as long as you continue to respond to treatment, or until you experience disease progression.

Even if you make use of the Cost Share Programme, you will still have to pay for additional costs, such as specialist care and administration at a private treatment centre. Check to see if these costs are covered by your health insurance policy, if you have one. The costs for Herceptin are spread over time, so not all of it has to be paid immediately. Patients usually pay for each cycle as they go, meaning they only pay for treatment while they benefit from it.

If you’d like more information on the Herceptin Cost Share Programme speak to your specialist. They can give you further details about whether Herceptin is right for you, the associated costs and eligibility.

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Kadcyla

Kadcyla is not funded by the government’s drug buying agency, PHARMAC. This means you will have to pay for this treatment. This could be covered by your health insurance, through fundraising programmes or out of your own pocket.

Under the Kadcyla Cost Share Programme a number of doses or ‘cycles’ of the medicine are provided free (the cost of the Roche medicine only). The Kadcyla Cost Share Programme also limits or caps the total amount you pay for Kadcyla. Once a patient reaches the cap, Roche will provide ongoing Kadcyla at no cost, for as long as you continue to respond to treatment, or until you experience disease progression.

Even if you make use of the Cost Share Programme, you will still have to pay for additional costs, such as specialist care and administration at a private treatment centre. Check to see if these costs are covered by your health insurance policy, if you have one. The costs for Kadcyla are spread over time, so not all of it has to be paid immediately. Patients usually pay for each cycle as they go, meaning they only pay for treatment while they benefit from it.

If you’d like more information on the Kadcyla Cost Share Programme speak to your specialist. They can give you further details about whether Kadcyla is right for you, the associated costs and eligibility.

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MabThera

Mabthera is not funded for maintenance of therapy in follicular lymphoma, or relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, by the government’s drug buying agency, PHARMAC. This means you will have to pay for this treatment. This could be covered by your health insurance, through fundraising programmes or out of your own pocket.

Under the MabThera Cost Share Programme a number of doses or ‘cycles’ of the medicine are provided free (the cost of the Roche medicine only).

Even if you make use of the Cost Share Programme, you will still have to pay for additional costs, such as specialist care and administration at a private treatment centre. Check to see if these costs are covered by your health insurance policy, if you have one. The costs for Mabthera are spread over time, so not all of it has to be paid immediately. Patients usually pay for each cycle as they go, meaning they only pay for treatment while they benefit from it.

If you’d like more information on the MabThera Cost Share Programme speak to your specialist. They can give you further details about whether Mabthera is right for you, the associated costs and eligibility.

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Zelboraf

Zelboraf is not funded by the government’s drug buying agency, PHARMAC. This means you will have to pay for this treatment. This could be covered by your health insurance, through fundraising programmes or out of your own pocket.

Under the Zelboraf Cost Share Programme a number of doses or ‘cycles’ of the medicine are provided free (the cost of the Roche medicine only). The Zelboraf Cost Share Programme also limits or caps the total amount you pay for Zelboraf. Once a patient reaches the cap, Roche will provide ongoing Zelboraf at no cost, for as long as you continue to respond to treatment, or until you experience disease progression.

Even if you make use of the Cost Share Programme, you will still have to pay for additional costs, such as specialist care and administration at a private treatment centre. Check to see if these costs are covered by your health insurance policy, if you have one. The costs for Zelboraf are spread over time, so not all of it has to be paid immediately. Patients usually pay for each cycle as they go, meaning they only pay for treatment while they benefit from it.

If you’d like more information on the Zelboraf Cost Share Programme speak to your specialist. They can give you further details about whether Zelboraf is right for you, the associated costs and eligibility.

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